Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division III –– Khandhaka
Book 21 –– Khandha Saṃyutta
Section 3 –– The Upper Fifty
Chapter 2 –– Dhammakathika (Dutiyo) Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

21. 3. 2. 113.

(113) Avijjā I –– Ignorance I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting, he said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, it is said ‘Ignorance.’ What is ignorance and how does someone come to ignorance?”

4. “Monk, the not learned ordinary man does not know matter, the arising of matter, the cessation of matter, and the path leading to the cessation of matter.

5. “The not learned ordinary man does not know feelings, their arising, cessation, and the path leading to their cessation.

6. “The not learned ordinary man does not know, perceptions their arising, cessation, and the path leading to their cessation.

7. “The not learned ordinary man does not know, intentions, their arising, cessation, and the path leading to their cessation.

8. “The not learned ordinary man does not know consciousness, its arising, cessation, and the path leading to its cessation.

9. “Monk, to this is called ignorance, with this much someone comes to ignorance.”

 

21. 3. 2. 2.

(114) Vijjā II –– Knowledge II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting, said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, it is said ‘Knowledge.’ What is knowledge and how does someone know?”

4. “Monk, the learned noble disciple of the Blessed One knows matter, the arising of matter, the cessation of matter, and the path leading to the cessation of matter;

5. “The learned noble disciple of the Blessed One knows feelings, their arising, cessation, and the path leading to their cessation.

6. “The learned noble disciple knows perceptions, their arising, cessation, and the path leading to their cessation.

7. “The learned noble disciple knows intentions, their arising, cessation, and the path leading to their cessation.

8. “The learned noble disciple knows consciousness, its arising, cessation, and the path leading to its cessation.

9. “Monk, to this is called knowledge, with this much someone comes to knowledge.”

 

21. 3. 2. 3.

(115) Dhammakathika I –– An Expounder of the Teaching I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting, said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, it is said, ‘An expounder of the Teaching.’ How does someone become an expounder of the Teaching?”

4. “The monk teaches for turning, loosing interest, and ceasing from matter. True to the words he is an expounder of the Teaching. The monk has fallen to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing matter. True to the words he has fallen to the method of following the Teaching. The monk has turned, lost interest, ceased, and is released without holding to matter. True to those words the monk experiences extinction in this life.

5-7. The monk teaches for turning, loosing interest, and ceasing feelings, perceptions, and intentions. True to the words he is an expounder of the Teaching. The monk has fallen to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing feelings, perceptions, and intentions. True to the words he has fallen to the method of following the Teaching. The monk has turned, lost interest, ceased, and is released without holding to feelings, perceptions, and intentions. True to those words the monk experiences extinction in this life.

8. “The monk teaches for turning, loosing interest, and ceasing consciousness. True to the words he is an expounder of the Teaching. The monk has fallen to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing consciousness. True to the words he has fallen to the method of following the Teaching. The monk has turned, lost interest and ceased without holding to consciousness. True to those words the monk experiences extinction in this life.

 

21. 3. 2. 4.

(116) Dhammaathika II –– An Expounder of the Teaching II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

2. Sitting, said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, it is said, ‘An expounder of the Teaching.’ How does someone become an expounder of the Teaching?”

3. “Monk, the monk teaches for turning, loosing interest, and ceasing from matter. True to the words he is an expounder of the Teaching. The monk has fallen to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing matter. True to the words he has fallen to the method of following the Teaching. The monk has turned, lost interest, ceased, and is released without holding to matter. True to those words the monk experiences extinction even at present.

4-6. The monk teaches for turning, loosing interest, and ceasing feelings, perceptions, and intentions. True to the words he is an expounder of the Teaching. The monk has fallen to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing feelings, perceptions, and intentions. True to the words he has fallen to the method of following the Teaching. The monk has turned, lost interest, ceased, and is released without holding to feelings, perceptions, and intentions. True to those words the monk experiences extinction even at present.

7. “The monk teaches for turning, loosing interest, and ceasing consciousness. True to the words he is an expounder of the Teaching. The monk has fallen to the method of turning, loosing interest, and ceasing consciousness. True to the words he has fallen to the method of following the Teaching. The monk has turned, lost interest and ceased without holding to consciousness. True to those words the monk experiences extinction even at present.”

 

21. 3. 2. 5.

(117) Bandhanā –– Bonds

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there.

3. “Here monks, the not learned ordinary man who has not seen noble ones, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, has not seen Great Beings, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, reflects matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. Monks, to this, it is said the not learned ordinary man is bound by matter, bound externally and internally, does not know the limit, does not see the beyond. Bound he is born, dies, and bound goes from this to the next world.

4. “He reflects feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self. Monks, to this, it is said the not learned ordinary man is bound by feelings, bound externally and internally, does not know the limit, does not see the beyond. Bound he is born, dies, and bound goes from this to the next world.

5. “He reflects perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self Monks, to this, it is said the not learned ordinary man is bound by perceptions, bound externally and internally, does not know the limit, does not see the beyond. Bound he is born, dies and bound, goes from this to the next world.

6. “He reflects intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self Monks, to this, is said the not learned ordinary man is bound by intentions, bound externally and internally, does not know the limit, does not see the beyond. Bound he is born, dies and bound, goes from this to the next world.

7. “He reflects consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness or in consciousness self Monks, to this, it is said the not learned ordinary man is bound by consciousness, bound externally and internally, does not know the limit, does not see the beyond. Bound he is born, dies and bound, goes from this to the next world.

8. “Monks, as for the learned noble disciple who has seen noble ones, heard their Teaching, trained and clever in their Teaching, has seen Great Beings and heard their Teaching, trained and clever in their Teaching, does not reflect matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self. Monks, to this, it is said the learned noble disciple is not bound by matter, not bound externally and internally, knows the limit and sees the beyond, I say he is released from unpleasantness.

9. “He does not reflect feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self Monks, to this it is said the learned noble disciple is not bound by feelings, is not bound externally and internally, knows the limit and sees the beyond. I say, he is released from unpleasantness.

10. “He does not reflect perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self Monks, to this, it is said the learned noble disciple is not bound by perceptions, is not bound externally and internally, knows the limit and sees the beyond. I say, he is released from unpleasantness.

11. “He does not reflect intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self. Monks, to this, is said the learned noble disciple is not bound by intentions, is not bound externally and internally, knows the limit and sees the beyond. I say, he is released from unpleasantness.

12. “He does not reflect consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness or in consciousness self. Monks, to this, is said the noble disciple is not bound by consciousness, is not bound externally and internally, knows the limit and sees the beyond. I say, he is released from unpleasantness.”

 

21. 3. 2. 6.

(118) Parimucchita I –– Set Free I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there

2. “Monks, do you imagine, ‘Matter is mine, I am matter,’ and do you reflect ‘it is my self’?”

“No, venerable sir, we do not.”

“Excellent! Monks! ‘Matter is not mine, I am not matter and it is not my self.’ This should be seen with right wisdom, as it really is.

3-5. “Monks, do you imagine ‘Feelings, perceptions, and intentions are mine, I am feelings, perceptions, and intentions,’ and do you reflect ‘they are my self’?”

“No, venerable sir, we do not.”

“Excellent! Monks! Feelings, perceptions, and intentions are not mine. I am not feelings, perceptions, and intentions, they are not my self. This should be seen with right wisdom, as it really is.

6. “Monks, do you imagine ‘Consciousness is mine, I am consciousness,’ and do you reflect ‘it is my self’?”

“No, venerable sir, we do not.”

“Excellent! Monks! ‘Consciousness is not mine, I am not consciousness and it is not my self.’ This should be seen with right wisdom, as it really is.

7. “Monks, the learned noble disciple, seeing this turns from matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness. Turning, looses interest and is released. Released, he knows, ‘I am released, birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done and there is nothing more to wish’.”

 

21. 3. 2. 7.

(119) Parimucchita II –– Set Free II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there.

2. “Monks, do you reflect, ‘Matter is not mine, I am not matter and it is not my self’?”

“Yes, venerable sir, we do.”

“Excellent! Monks! Matter is not mine, I am not matter and it is not my self. This should be seen with right wisdom, as it really is.

3-5. “Monks, do you reflect, ‘Feelings, perceptions, and intentions are not mine, I am not feelings, perceptions, and intentions and they are not my self’?”

“Yes, venerable sir, we do.”

“Excellent! Monks! ‘Feelings, perceptions, and intentions are not mine. I am not feelings, perceptions, and intentions they are not my self.’ This should be seen with right wisdom, as it really is.

6. “Monks, do you reflect, “consciousness is not mine. I am not consciousness and it is not my self’?”

“Yes, venerable sir, we do.”

“Excellent! Monks! Consciousness is not mine, I am not consciousness and it is not my self. This should be seen with right wisdom, as it really is.

7. “Monks, the learned noble disciple, seeing this turns from matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness. Turning, looses interest and is released. Released, he knows, ‘I am released, birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done and I have nothing more to wish’.”

 

21. 3. 2. 8.

(120) Saññojanaṃ –– Bonds

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there:

3. “Monks, what are the binding things and what are bonds?

4. “Monks, matter is a binding thing and the interest and greed for matter is the bond.

5. “Monks, feelings are binding things and the interest and greed for feelings is the bond.

6. “Monks, perceptions are binding things and the interest and greed for perceptions is the bond.

7. “Monks, intentions are binding things and the interest and greed for intentions is the bond.

8. “Monks, consciousness is a binding thing and the interest and greed for consciousness is the bond.

9. “Monks, these are the binding things and the bonds.”

 

21. 3. 2. 9.

(121) Upādānaṃ –– Holding

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there:

3. “Monks, what are the holding things and what is holding?

4. “Monks, matter is a holding thing and the interest and greed for matter is the holding.

5. “Monks, feelings are holding things and the interest and greed for feelings is the holding.

6. “Monks, perceptions are holding things and the interest and greed for perceptions is the holding.

7. “Monks, intentions are holding things and the interest and greed for intentions is the holding.

8. “Monks, consciousness is a holding thing and the interest and greed for consciousness is the holding.

9. “Monks, these are the holding things and the holdings.”

 

21. 3. 2. 10.

(122) Sīlaṃ –– Virtues

1. At one time venerable Mahākoṭṭhita and venerable Sāriputta lived in the deer park in Isipatana in Benares.

2. Then venerable Mahākoṭṭhita got up from his seclusion in the evening approached venerable Sāriputta, exchanged friendly greeting and sat on a side.

3. Sitting, venerable Mahākoṭṭhita said to venerable Sāriputta: “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the virtuous monk reflect on?”

4. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, the virtuous monk should reflect on the five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

5. “What five? The holding masses of matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness. Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, the virtuous monk should reflect on these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

6. “Friend, there is a possibility for the virtuous monk reflecting on these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of entering the stream of the Teaching.”

7. “Friend Sāriputta, on what things should the monk who has entered the stream of the Teaching wisely reflect?”

8. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the monk who has entered the stream of the Teaching should reflect these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

9. “Friend, there is a possibility for the monk who has entered the stream of the Teaching, reflecting these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of coming to this world only once more.”

10. “Friend Sāriputta, on what things should the monk coming to this world only once more, wisely reflect?”

11. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the monk coming to this world once more, should reflect on these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

12. Friend, there is a possibility for the monk coming to this world once more, wisely reflecting these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of not coming to this world any more.”

13. “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the monk not coming to this world any more wisely reflect?”

14. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the monk not coming to this world any more, should reflect these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

15. “Friend, there is a possibility for the monk not coming to this world any more, wisely reflecting these five holding masses as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of worthiness.”

16. “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the worthy monk wisely reflect on?”

17. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the worthy monk should reflect these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

18. “Friend, to the worthy monk there is nothing more to do, yet wisely reflecting these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self conduces to a pleasant abiding here and now and for mindful awareness.”

 

21. 3. 2. 11.

(123) Sutavā –– The Learned Monk

1. At one time venerable Mahākoṭṭhita and venerable Sāriputta lived in the deer park in Isipatana in Benares.

2. Then venerable Mahākoṭṭhita got up from his seclusion in the evening approached venerable Sāriputta, exchanged friendly greeting and sat on a side.

3. Sitting venerable Mahākoṭṭhita said to venerable Sāriputta: “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the learned monk reflect on?”

4. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, the learned monk should reflect on the five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

5. “What five? The holding masses of matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness. Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, the learned monk should reflect on these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

6. “Friend, there is a possibility for the learned monk reflecting on these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of entry, to the stream of the Teaching”

7. “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the monk who has entered to the stream of the Teaching wisely reflect?”

8. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the monk who has entered the stream of the Teaching should reflect these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

9. “Friend, there is a possibility for the monk who has entered the stream of the Teaching, reflecting these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of coming to this world only once more.”

10. “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the monk coming to this world only once more, wisely reflect?”

11. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the monk coming to this world once more should reflect these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

12. “Friend, there is a possibility for the monk coming to this world once more, wisely reflecting these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of not coming to this world any more.”

13. “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the monk not coming to this world any more wisely reflect on?”

14. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the monk not coming to this world any more, should reflect these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

15. “Friend, there is a possibility for the monk not coming to this world any more, wisely reflecting these five holding masses as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self to realize the fruit of worthiness”

16. “Friend Sāriputta, what things should the worthy monk wisely reflect on?”

17. “Friend Mahākoṭṭhita, even the worthy monk should reflect these five holding masses as impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self.

18. “Friend, to the worthy monk there is nothing more to do, yet wisely reflecting these five holding masses, as, impermanent, unpleasant, ailing, an abscess, an arrow, dark space, an illness, foreign, void, and as not self conduces to a pleasant abiding here and now and to mindful awareness.”

 

21. 3. 2. 12.

(124) Kappo I –– Venerable Kappa I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then venerable Kappa approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, knowing what and seeing what in this sixfold conscious body and all external signs do the latent tendencies of measuring with selfish interest and conceit get dispelled?”

4. “Kappa, whatever matter in the past, future, or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all that matter is not mine, am not in it and it is not my self, should be seen as it really is, with right wisdom.

5-7. “Kappa, whatever feelings, perceptions, and intentions in the past, future, or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all those feelings, perceptions, and intentions are not mine, am not in them, and they are not my self, should be seen as it really is, with right wisdom.

8. “Kappa, whatever consciousness in the past, future, or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all that consciousness is not mine, am not in it and it is not my self, should be seen as it really is, with right wisdom.

9. “Kappa, knowing thus and seeing thus in this sixfold conscious body and all external signs the latent tendencies of measuring with selfish interest and conceit get dispelled.”

 

21. 3. 2. 13.

(125) Kappo II –– Venerable Kappa II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then venerable Kappa approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting, said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, knowing what and seeing what in this sixfold conscious body and all external signs do the latent tendencies of measuring with selfish interest and conceit appeased and the mind, well released, going beyond all measuring?”

4. “Kappa, whatever matter in the past, future, or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all that matter is not mine, am not in it and it is not my self, should be seen as it really is, with right wisdom.

5-7. “Kappa, whatever feelings, perceptions, and intentions in the past, future, or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all those feelings, perceptions, and intentions are not mine, am not in them and they are not my self, should be seen as it really is, with right wisdom.

8. “Kappa, whatever consciousness in the past, future, or at present, seized or not, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, all that consciousness is not mine, am not in it and it is not my self, should be seen as it really is, with right wisdom.

9. “Kappa, knowing thus and seeing thus in this sixfold conscious body and all external signs the latent tendencies of measuring with selfish interest and conceit are appeased and the mind is well released, going beyond all measuring.”