Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division III –– Khandhaka
Book 21 –– Khandha Saṃyutta
Section 1 –– The Root Fifty
Chapter 5 –– Attadīpa (Pañcamo) Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

21. 1. 5. 1.

(43) Attadīpa –– Be a Light for Yourself

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika hin Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, abide becoming a light and refuge to your self, not searching another refuge; consider the Teaching as a light, a refuge, and do not search another Teaching.

4. “Monks, the monk who abides becoming a light and refuge to his self, not searching another refuge, considering the Teaching as his light and refuge, not searching another Teaching, should investigate wisely.

5. “He should investigate the root cause for the arising of grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress and investigate from what they proceed.

6. “Here, monks, the not learned ordinary man who has not seen noble ones or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, has not seen Great Beings, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, reflects, ‘Matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self.’ That matter changes, and grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress arise to him.

7. “He reflects, ‘Feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self.’ His feelings change, and grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress arise to him.

8. “He reflects, ‘Perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions, or in perceptions self. His perceptions change and grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress arise

9. “He reflects, ‘Intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self.’ His intentions change and grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress arise.

10. “He reflects, ‘Consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self.’ His consciousness changes, and grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress arise.

11. “Monks, knowing the impermanence, change, loss of interest, and cessation of that matter, in the past and also at present as it really is, with right wisdom the grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress fade. He is not worried with that fading and abides pleasantly. The monk abiding pleasantly is said has become suitable by that means.

12. “Monks, knowing the impermanence, change, loss of interest, and cessation of feelings in the past and also at present as it really is, with right wisdom, the grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress fade. He is not worried with that fading and abides pleasantly. The monk abiding pleasantly is said has become suitable by that means

13. “Monks, knowing the impermanence, change, loss of interest, and cessation of perceptions in the past and also at present as it really is, with right wisdom, the grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress fade. He is not worried with that fading and abides pleasantly. The monk abiding pleasantly is said has become suitable by that means.

14, “Monks, knowing the impermanence, change, loss of interest, and cessation of intentions in the past and also at present as it really is, with right wisdom, the grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress fade. He is not worried with that fading and abides pleasantly. The monk abiding pleasantly is said has become suitable by that means.

15. “Monks, knowing the impermanence, change, loss of interest, and cessation of consciousness in the past and also at present as it really is, with right wisdom, the grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, and distress fade. He is not worried with that fading and abides pleasantly. The monk abiding pleasantly is said has become suitable by that means.”

 

21. 1. 5. 2.

(44) Paṭipadā –– Method

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, I will teach the method for the arising of self view and the cessation of self view. Listen and attend to it carefully.

4. “Monks, what is the method for the arising of self view?

5. “Here, monks, the not learned ordinary man who has not seen noble ones, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, has not seen Great Beings, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, reflects, ‘Matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self.’

6. “He reflects, ‘Feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self.’

7. “He reflects, ‘Perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions or in perceptions self.’

8. “He reflects, ‘Intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self.’

9. “He reflects, ‘Consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self.’

10. “Monks, this is the method for the arising of self view. Monks, it is the method for reflecting unpleasantness.’’

11. “Monks, what is the method for the cessation of self view?

12. “Here, monks, the learned noble disciple who has seen noble ones, heard their Teaching, trained and clever in their Teaching, has seen Great Beings, heard their Teaching, trained and clever in their Teaching, does not see matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self.

13. “He does not reflect, ‘Feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self.’

14. “He does not reflect, ‘Perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions or in perceptions self.’

15. “He does not reflect, ‘Intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self.’

16. “He does not reflect, ‘Consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self.’

17. “Monks, to this is said the method of the cessation of self view. Monks, it is the method of reflecting the cessation of unpleasantness.”

 

21. 1. 5. 3.

(45) Aniccatā I –– Impermanence I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, matter is impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. That which is unpleasant is not self. That which is not self is not mine, I am not in it and is not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom. When this is seen as it really is, with right wisdom, the mind looses interest and finds release without desires.

4.-7. “Monks, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness are impermanent, those which are impermanent are unpleasant. Those which are unpleasant are not self. Those which are not self are not mine. I am not in them and they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom. When this is seen as it really is, with right wisdom, the mind looses interest and finds release without desires.

8. “Monks, when the monk’s mind looses interest and finds release without desires in the element of matter, in the element of feelings, in the element of perceptions, in the element of intentions and the element of consciousness, the release gets established and happiness gets established without worries. The not worried one is finally extinguished and he knows, ‘Birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end and there is nothing more to wish.’”

 

21. 1. 5. 4.

(46) Aniccatā II –– Impermanence II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, matter is impermanent. That which is impermanent is unpleasant. That which is unpleasant is not self. That which is not self is not mine, I am not in it and is not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom. When this is seen as it really is, with right wisdom, the mind looses interest and finds release without desires.

4.-7. “Monks, feelings, perceptions, intentions and consciousness are impermanent, those which are impermanent are unpleasant. Those which are unpleasant are not self. Those which are not self are not mine, I am not in them, they are not my self. This should be seen as it really is with right wisdom. When this is seen as it really is, with right wisdom, the mind looses interest and finds release without desires.

8. “Monks, when the monk sees this as it really is with right wisdom, the mind does not speculate about the past. When there are no speculations of the past, he has no speculations of the future. When there are no speculations of the future, he does not hold fast, looses interest, and is released from matter, feelings, perceptions, intentions, and consciousness without desires. The release gets established and happiness gets established without worries. The not worried is finally extinguished and he knows, ‘Birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end and there is nothing more to wish.’”

 

21. 1. 5. 5.

(47) Samanupassnā –– Reflections

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, whoever recluses or brahmins reflecting the various reflections of the self, reflect on the five holding masses in one or another way.

4. “What five?

“Monks, the not learned ordinary man who has not seen noble ones, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, has not seen Great Beings, or heard their Teaching, not trained and not clever in their Teaching, reflect ‘Matter from self, or a material self, or in self matter, or in matter self.’ Reflect, ‘Feelings from self, or a feeling self, or in self feelings, or in feelings self.’

“Reflect, ‘Perceptions from self, or a perceiving self, or in self perceptions or in perceptions self.’ Reflect, ‘Intentions from self, or an intending self, or in self intentions, or in intentions self.’ Reflect, ‘Consciousness from self, or a conscious self, or in self consciousness, or in consciousness self.’ Thus with this same reflection he concludes ‘I am’.

5. “Monks, concluding ‘I be’ he approaches the five mental faculties, the mental faculty, of the eye, of the ear, of the nose, of the tongue, and the mental faculty of the body.

6. “Monks, there is the mind, ideas, and the element of knowledge. The ordinary person touched by ignorance and feeling in accordance, it occurs to him ‘I be’, or ‘This is my self,’ or ‘I will be,’ or ‘I will not be,’ or ‘I will be material,’ or ‘I will be immaterial,’ or ‘I will be perceptive,’ or ‘I will be not perceptive,’ or ‘I will be neither perceptive nor non-perceptive.’

7. “Monks, he settles in those five mental faculties, as for the learned noble disciple, his ignorance faded and knowledge arisen. it does not occur to him ‘I be’, or ‘This is my self,’ or ‘I will not be,’ or ‘I will be material,’ or ‘I will be immaterial,’ or ‘I will be perceptive,’ or ‘I will be not perceptive,’ or ‘I will be neither perceptive nor non-perceptive.’

 

21. 1. 5. 6.

(48) Khandā –– The Masses

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, I will teach the five masses and the five holding masses. Listen and attend carefully to it.

4. “Monks, what are the five masses?

5. “Monks, whatever matter in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, un exalted or exalted, far or near, to this is called the mass of matter.

6.-7. “Monks, whatever feelings, whatever perceptions in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, to these are called the mass of feelings and the mass of perceptions.

8. “Monks, whatever intentions in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, to this is called the mass of intentions.

9. “Monks, whatever consciousness in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, to this is called the mass of consciousness.

10. “Monks to these are called the five masses

11. “Monks, what are the five holding masses?

12. “Monks, whatever matter, seized with desires in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, to this is called the holding mass of matter.

13.-14. “Monks, whatever feelings, seized with desires, whatever perceptions seized with desires in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, to this is called the holding mass of feelings, the holding mass of perceptions.

15. “Monks, whatever intentions seized in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, to this is called the holding mass of intentions.

16. “Monks, whatever consciousness seized with desires in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, to this is called the holding mass of consciousness.

17. “Monks to these are called the five holding masses.”

 

21. 1. 5. 7.

(49) Soṇo I –– The Householder’s son Soṇa I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels’ sanctuary in the Bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. Then Soṇa the son of a householder approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. The Blessed One said to Soṇa:

4. “Soṇa, if recluses and brahmins formed out of impermanent, unpleasant, changing matter were to reflect, ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is not knowing things as they really are.

5. “If recluses and brahmins with impermanent, unpleasant, changing feelings were to reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is not knowing, things, as they really are.

6. If recluses and brahmins with impermanent, unpleasant, changing perceptions were to reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is not knowing, things, as they really are.

7. “If recluses and brahmins with impermanent, unpleasant, changing intentions were to reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is not knowing, things, as they really are.

8. If recluses and brahmins with impermanent, unpleasant, changing consciousness were to reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is not knowing, things, as they really are.

9. “Soṇa, if recluses and brahmins formed out of impermanent, unpleasant, changing matter should not reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is knowing things as they really are.

10. “If recluses and brahmins formed out of impermanent, unpleasant, changing feelings should not reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is knowing, things, as they really are.

11. “If recluses and brahmins formed out of impermanent, unpleasant, changing perceptions should not reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is knowing, things, as they really are.

12. “If recluses and brahmins formed out of impermanent, unpleasant, changing intentions should not reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is knowing, things, as they really are.

13. “If recluses and brahmins formed out of impermanent, unpleasant, changing consciousness should not reflect ‘I am superior, equal, or inferior,’ it is knowing things, as they really are.

14. “Soṇa, is matter permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, it is impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant, and a changing thing, is it suitable to be reflected, ‘‘It is mine, I am there, it is my self’?’”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

15. “Soṇa, are feelings permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, they are impermanent.”

“Those which are impermanent, are they unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, they are unpleasant.”

“Those which are impermanent, unpleasant, changing things, are they suitable to be reflected as, ‘They are mine, I am they, they are my self’?”

“That is not so, venerable sir”

16-17 Soṇa, are perceptions and intentions permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, they are impermanent.”

“That which are impermanent, are they unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, they are unpleasant.”

“Those which are impermanent, unpleasant and changing, are they suitable to be reflected, they are mine, I am there, they are my self?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

18. Soṇa, is consciousness permanent or impermanent?”

“Venerable sir, it is impermanent.”

“That which is impermanent, is it unpleasant or pleasant?”

“Venerable sir, it is unpleasant.”

“That which is impermanent, unpleasant, changing, is it suitable to be reflected, ‘It is mine, I am there, it is my self’?”

“That is not so, venerable sir.”

19. “Therefore Soṇa, whatever matter in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, it is not mine, I am not there, it is not my self.

20.-22. “Monks, whatever feelings and whatever perceptions and whatever intentions in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, they are not mine, I am not there, they are not my self.

23. “Monks, whatever consciousness in the past, future, or at present, internal or external, rough or fine, unexalted or exalted, far or near, is not mine, I am not there, it is not my self.

24. “Soṇa, the learned noble disciple seeing it thus turns from matter, turns from feelings, turns from perceptions, turns from intentions and turns from consciousness. Turning looses interest. Loosing interest is released and knowledge arises I am released. He knows, ‘Birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived to the end, duties are done, and there is nothing more to wish.’”

 

21. 1. 5. 8.

(50) Sono II –– The Householder’s son, Soṇa II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels’ sanctuary in the Bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

2. Then Soṇa the son of a householder approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. The Blessed One said to Soṇa:

4. “Soṇa, I do not reckon the recluses and brahmins as recluses and brahmins, or that they have attained recluseship or become brahmins or in this life would attain recluseship and become brahmins if they do not know matter, the arising of matter, the cessation of matter, and the method of ceasing matter; feelings, the arising of feelings, the cessation of feelings and the method of ceasing feelings; perceptions, the arising of perceptions, the cessation of perceptions, and the method of ceasing perceptions; intentions, the arising of intentions, the cessation of intentions, and the method of ceasing intentions; and consciousness, the arising of consciousness, the cessation of consciousness, and the method of ceasing consciousness.

5. “Soṇa, I reckon the recluses and brahmins as recluses and brahmins, or that they have attained recluseship or become brahmins or in this life would attain recluseship and become brahmins, if they know matter, the arising of matter, the cessation of matter it is mine, I am there, it is my self?matter, feelings, the arising of feelings, the cessation of feelings and the method of ceasing feelings, perceptions, the arising of perceptions, the cessation of perceptions and the method of ceasing perceptions, intentions, the arising of intentions, the cessation of intentions and the method of ceasing intentions and consciousness, the arising of consciousness, the cessation of consciousness and the method of ceasing consciousness.

 

21. 1. 5. 9.

(51) Nandikkhaya I –– Destruction of Interest I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, the monk constantly reflects matter as impermanent, to him it becomes right view, seeing it correctly he turns from matter. Destroying interest is destroying greed, and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

4. “Monks, the monk constantly reflects feelings as impermanent, to him it becomes right view, seeing it correctly he turns from feelings. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

5. “Monks, the monk constantly reflects perceptions as impermanent, to him it becomes right view, seeing it correctly he turns from perceptions. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

6. “Monks, the monk constantly reflects intentions as impermanent, to him it becomes right view, seeing it correctly he turns from intentions. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

7. “Monks, the monk constantly reflects consciousness as impermanent, to him it becomes right view, seeing it correctly he turns from consciousness. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.”

 

21. 1. 5. 10.

(52) Nandikkhayā II –– Destruction of Interest II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, wisely reflect matter and the sign as impermanent as it really is. When the monk wisely reflects matter and the sign as impermanent, as it really is, he turns from matter. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

4. “Monks, wisely reflect the feeling and the sign as impermanent as it really is. When the monk wisely reflects the feeling and the sign, as impermanent as it really is, he turns from feelings. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

5. “Monks, wisely reflect the perception and its sign as impermanent, as it really is. When the monk wisely reflects the perception and the sign as impermanent as it really is, he turns from perceptions. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

6. “Monks, wisely reflect the intention and the sign as impermanent, as it really is. When the monk wisely reflects the intention and the sign as impermanent, as it really is, he turns from intentions. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.

7. “Monks, wisely reflect consciousness and the sign as impermanent, as it really is. When the monk wisely reflects consciousness and the sign as impermanent, as it really is, he turns from consciousness. Destroying interest is destroying greed and destroying greed is destroying interest. With the destruction of interest and greed the mind is released and well released, it is said.”