Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division II –– Nidāna
Book 19 –– Opamma Saṃyutta
Chapter 1 –– Paṭhamo Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

19. 1. 1.

(1) Kūṭaṃ –– At the Highest Point

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. From there the Blessed One addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, all the beams supporting the framework of the roof come together and meet at the highest point of the gabled roof.

4. “Monks, in the same manner whatever demerit get rooted in ignorance, come together and meet ignorance and is controlled by ignorance.

5. “Therefore monks, you should train thus: ‘We will live diligently’.”

 

19. 1. 2.

(2) Nakhasikaṃ –– On the Nail of the Thumb

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. The Blessed One raised a little soil on the nail of his thumb and addressed the monks:

3. “Monks, look at the little soil on the nail of my thumb and tell me what is more, is it the soil on my nail of the thumb or on this great earth?”

4. “Venerable sir, the soil on this great earth is very much more than the little soil raised by the nail of the thumb.”

5. “In the same manner, monks, it’s only a few that are born as human and those born other than human are the major portion.”

6. “Therefore monks, you should train thus: ‘We will live diligently’.”

 

19. 1. 3.

(3) Kulaṃ –– Families

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, families which have many women and few men are easily attacked by robbers and by others who steal.

3. “In the same manner monks if the monk has not developed and made much, the release of mind in loving kindness he is easily attacked by non-humans.

4. “Monks, families that have many men and few women are difficult to be attacked by robbers and by others who steal.

5. “In the same manner monks, the monk who has developed and made much, the release of mind in loving kindness is difficult to be attacked by non-humans.

6. “Therefore, monks, you should train, ‘our release of mind in loving kindness should be developed, made much, made a habit, thoroughly practiced, should be looked after and thoroughly undertaken.’

“Monks, you should train in this manner.”

 

19. 1. 4.

(4) Ukkhā –– A Pots of Rice

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, developing the thought of loving kindness for at least a very short time in the morning, or developing the thought of loving kindness for at least a very short time at mid day or developing the thought of loving kindness for at least a very short time at night fall is more fruitful than offering a hundred pots of rice in the morning, or offering a hundred pots of rice at mid day, or offering a hundred pots of rice at night fall.

3. “Therefore, monks, you should train, ‘our release of mind in loving kindness should be developed, made much, made a habit, thoroughly practiced, should be looked after and thoroughly undertaken.’

“Monks, you should train in this manner.”

 

19. 1. 5.

(5) Satti –– Sword

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, a man accosted with a sharp sword says ‘I will avoid this sharp sword, bend it and turn it aside with my hand or fist.’

3. “Monks, could that man avoid the sharp sword, bend it and turn it aside with his hand or fist?”

“Venerable sir, it would not be possible.”

4. “What is the reason?”

“Venerable sir, it is not possible for that man to avoid, bend or turn aside the sharp sword with his hand or fist. He will be fatigued and fall into trouble.”

5. “In the same manner, monks, if non-humans think to derange the mind of the monk who has developed and made much, the release of mind in loving kindness, they will be fatigued and fall into trouble.

6. “Therefore, monks, you should train, ‘our release of mind in loving kindness should be developed, made much, made a habit, thoroughly practised, should be looked after and thoroughly undertaken.’

“Monks, you should train in this manner.”

 

19. 1. 6.

(6) Dhanuggaho –– An Archer

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi. And the Blessed One addressed the monks:

2. “Monks, four well-experienced archers who are trained, quick, and clever, stand in the four directions.

3. “Then a man comes and says: ‘I will shoot these four well experienced, trained, quick, and clever archers standing in the four directions and before they fall on the ground I will come up with them.’

4. “Monks, do you consider him a clever man endowed with the highest speed, true to that word?”

5. “Venerable sir, if he could shoot even one of these four well experienced, trained, quick, and clever archers standing in the four directions and before he falls on the ground, if he could come up with him.

“He is a clever man endowed with the highest speed, true to those words and there is nothing to doubt about it, if he could shoot the four well experienced, trained, quick and clever archers standing in the four directions and before they fall on the ground could come up with them.”

6. “Monks, the speed of sun and moon exceeds the speed of that man. Monks, the speed of the gods exceeds the speed of sun and moon. The life span of beings diminish even more speedily.

7. “Therefore, monks, you should train, ‘we will live diligently.’

“Monks, you should train in this manner.”

 

19. 1. 7.

(7) Āṇi –– A Commander

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi. And the Blessed One addressed the monks:

2. “Monks, in the past there was a drum by the name Commander of the Ten Directions.

3. “When the drum Commander of the Ten Directions was beaten, other drums too sounded. Monks, there was a time when the skin stretched on the surface of the drum disappeared and the other drums that sounded too diminished.

4. “Monks, in the same manner there will be monks in the future ––

5. “Who would not lend ear and arouse the mind to know, do not think to learn and practise the Teaching declared by the Thus Gone One in the discourses which are deep with subtle meaning leading beyond this world.

6. “They would lend ear and arouse the mind to know, think to learn and practise the Teaching declared by the disciples in the discourses which are poetical and in stories which are elaborate and of external nature. Monks in this manner the Teaching declared by the Thus Gone One in the discourses which are deep with subtle meaning leading beyond this world and is void will disappear.

7. “Therefore, monks, you should train in this manner: ‘We will lend ear and arouse the mind to know and think to learn and practise the Teaching declared by the Thus Gone One in the discourses which are deep with subtle meaning leading beyond this world and established in the void.’

“Monks, you should train in this manner.”

 

19. 1. 8.

(8) Kaliṅgaro –– A block of Wood

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the hall with a gabled roof.

2. The Blessed One addressed the monks from there saying “Monks,” and those monks replied saying, “Yes venerable sir.” And the Blessed One said:

3. “Monks, at this time the Licchavis live diligently and zealously attending to their services. Their king Ajātasattu of Magadha the son of Vedeha does not see a cause and get a chance to intervene.

4. “Monks, in the future there will be a time when the softness of the beautiful hands and feet of the Licchavis would dry up and they would sleep until sun rise with their huge bodies. Then king Ajātasattu of Magadha the son of Vedeha will obtain a cause and chance to intervene.

5. “Monks, at present the monks live diligent and zealous to dispel as though have taken a block of wood for the pillow. And Māra the Evil One does not obtain a cause and reason to intervene.

6. “Monks, in the future there will be a time when the softness of the beautiful hands and feet of the monks would dry up and they would sleep until sun rise with their huge bodies. Then Māra the Evil One will obtain a cause and chance to intervene.

7. “Therefore, monks you should train thus, ‘We will live diligent and zealous to dispel as though have taken a block of wood for the pillow.’ That is how you should train."

 

19. 1. 9.

(9) Nāgo –– An Elephant

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. At that time a certain novice monk used to approach families too much. Then the other monks said to him: “Friend, do not approach families too much.”

3. Then he replied to those monks thus: “These elder monks think of approaching families, what does it matter if I do it?”

4. Then many monks approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

5. Sitting on a side those monks said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, a certain novice approaches families too much. Then the other monks said to him, ‘Friend, do not approach families too much,’ and he replied to those monks saying, ‘The elder monks think of approaching families, what does it matter if I do it?’”

6. “Monks, in the past there was a huge pond in the forest, and elephants lived supported by it. Elephants descended the pond, pulled out lotus stalks with their trunks, washed them well and collected them away from the mud and ate them. On account of that they became beautiful and powerful and did not come to disaster or anything close to disaster.

7. “Monks, the young elephants and the little ones who followed the older elephants descended the pond, pulled out lotus stalks with their trunks, did not wash them well and collected them in the mud and ate them. On account of that they did not become beautiful and powerful and came to disaster or something close to disaster.

8. “Monks, in the same manner here some elder monks wear robes in the morning and taking bowls and robes enter some village or hamlet for alms food, there they preach the lay crowds. The pleased lay crowds express their pleasure. They partake those gains not enslaved, not swooned, without a guilt, seeing the danger and wise about the escape On account of that they become beautiful and powerful and do not come to disaster or anything close to disaster.

9. “Monks, the novice monks trained by the elder monks wear robes in the morning and taking bowls and robes enter a village or hamlet for alms food.

10. “There they preach the lay crowds. The pleased lay crowds express their pleasure. The monks partake those gains enslaved, infatuated, guilty of an offence, not seeing the danger and not wise about the escape. On account of that they do not become beautiful and powerful and come to disaster or something close to disaster.

11. ‘Therefore, monks you should train thus: ‘We should partake gains not enslaved, not infatuated, not guilty of an offence, seeing the danger and wise about the escape.’ Monks, you should train in this manner.”

 

19. 1. 10.

(10) Biḷāro –– A Cat

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. At that time a certain monk was engaged with the business of families too long. Then other monks said to him: “Friend, do not be engaged with the business of families for such a long time.”

3. He did not take that advice and did not stop it.

4. Then many monks approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

5. Sitting on a side those monks said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, a certain monk is engaged in the business of families too much. We told him friend, do not be engaged in the business of families too much, he did not take the advice and did not stop it.”

6. “Monks, in the past there was a cat who tracked weak mice at the edge of rubbish heaps and dust heaps, thinking. ‘When these weak mice come for food, I will get at them and eat them then and there.’

7. “Then, monks, the weak mice came for food and the cat ate them completely. It ate the mice and their entrails as a result it met death or unpleasantness close to death.

8. “In the same manner, monks, a certain monk wearing robes in the morning and taking bowl and robes enters a certain village or hamlet for alms food not protected in the body, in words and the mind.

9. “There he sees a woman not well dressed and not well covered and his mind is overwhelmed with greed. With a mind overwhelmed with greed he comes to death or deathly unpleasantness.

10. “Monks, in the dispensation of the noble ones death is a synonym for the monk’s stepping down from the holy life. Deathly unpleasantness is a synonym for falling to some offence, for which he has to make amends by some declared suitable means.

11. “Therefore, monks, you should train thus: ‘We will enter a village or hamlet for alms food, with our body, words and mind protected, mindfulness established and with controlled mental faculties.’

Monks you should train thus.”

 

19. 1. 11.

(11) Sigāla I –– A Jackal I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi. And the Blessed One addressed the monks from there.

2. “Monks have you heard the barking of the jackal in the last watch of the night?”

“Yes, we have, Venerable sir.”

3. Monks, the decayed jackal suffers from an ailment called ‘ukkannaka’. Suffering from that ailment it goes wherever it likes, stands wherever it likes, sits wherever it likes and lies wherever it likes.

4. “Monks, how would it be like if someone who has promised to be a son of the Blessed One, was with such an ailment?

5. “Therefore, monks, you should train, ‘We will live diligently.’

6. “Monks, you should train in that.”

 

19. 1. 12.

(12) Sigāla II–– A Jackal II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi. And the Blessed One addressed the monks from there.

2. “Monks have you heard the barking of the jackal in the last watch of the night?”

“Yes, we have, Venerable sir.”

3. “Monks, has that decayed jackal any good manners and gratitude, I think a certain one who has promised to be a son of the Blessed One too does not know manners and gratitude.

4. “Therefore, monks, you should train thus: ‘We will develop our good manners and think gratefully of even some little thing done to us.’

“This should be your training.”