Sutta Pitaka
Saṃyutta Nikāya
Division II –– Nidāna
Book 12 –– Abhisamaya Saṃyutta
Chapter 2 –– Āhāra Vagga

Namo tassa bhagavato arahato sammā sambuddhassa

 

12. 2. 1.

(11) Āhāra –– Supports

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

From there the Blessed One addressed the monks: “Monks!” Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.” And the Blessed One said thus:

2. “Monks,ṭhese four are the supports for the upkeep of the born and for the protection of those to be born.

“What four? Hard or soft eatable food is the first, Contact is the second. Cogitation is third and consciousness is the fourth. Monks,ṭhese four are the supports for the upkeep of the born and for the protection of those to be born.

3. “Monks, what is the origin, rising, birth and product of these four supports? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of these four supports is craving.

4. “Monks, and this craving, what is its origin, rising, birth, and product of craving? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of craving, are feelings.

5. “Monks, and these feelings, what is their origin, rising, birth, and product? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of feelings are contacts.

6. “Monks, and contacts, what are their origin, rising, birth, and product? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of contacts are the six spheres.

7. “Monks, and the six spheres, what is their origin, rising, birth, and product? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of the six spheres, are name and matter.

8. “Monks, and this name and matter, what is its origin, rising, birth, and product? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of name and matter, is consciousness.

9. “Monks, and this name and matter, what is its origin, rising, birth, and product? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of name and matter, are determinations.

10. “Monks, and these determinations, what is their origin, rising, birth, and product? Monks, the origin rising birth and product of determinations, is ignorance.

11. “Thus monks, from ignorance rise determinations and from the threefold determinations rises consciousness ... re ... Thus is the arising of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

12. “With the cessation of ignorance without a remainder determinations cease. With the cessation of determinations, consciousness cease. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 2. 2.

(12) Phagguno –– Venerable Pagguna

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

From there the Blessed One addressed the monks: “Monks!” Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.” And the Blessed One said thus:

2. “Monks, there are four supports for the upkeep of the born and for the protection of those to be born.

“What four? Hard or soft eatable food is the first, Contact is the second. Cogitation is third and consciousness is the fourth. Monks, these are the supports for the upkeep of the born and for the protection of those to be born.”

3. Then venerable Moliya Phagguna said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, who partakes, consciousness?”

The Blessed One said, “That is not a suitable question. I did not say someone partakes, if I had said some one partakes, it would be a suitable question. ‘Venerable sir, who partakes?’ is not a suitable question’ The suitable question should be; ‘Venerable sir, for what purpose is the support consciousness?’ Explaining it rightfully, the support consciousness is for the purpose of future rebirth. When produced there are the six spheres and on account of the six spheres there is a contact.”

4. “Venerable sir, who experiences the contact?” The Blessed One said, “That is not a suitable question. I did not say someone experiences a contact, if I had said some one experiences a contact it would be a suitable question. ‘Venerable sir, who experiences a contact?’ is not a suitable question. The suitable question should be, ‘Venerable sir, on account of what is a contact?’ Explaining it rightfully, a contact is on account of the six spheres and on account of a contact, there are feelings.

5. “Venerable sir, who feels?” The Blessed One said, “That is not a suitable question. I did not say someone feels, if I had said some one feels it would be a suitable question. ‘Venerable sir, who feels?’ is not a suitable question. The suitable question should be; ‘Venerable sir, on account of what is a feeling?’ Explaining it rightfully, a feeling is on account of a contact and on account of feelings there is craving.”

6. “Venerable sir, who craves?” The Blessed One said, “That is not a suitable question. I did not say someone craves, if I had said someone craves, it would be a suitable question. ‘Venerable sir, who craves?’ is not a suitable question. The suitable question should be; ‘Venerable sir, on account of what is craving?’ Explaining it rightfully, craving is on account of feelings and on account of craving is holding.

7. “Venerable sir, who holds?” The Blessed One said, “That is not a suitable question. I did not say someone holds, if I had said someone holds it would be a suitable question. ‘Venerable sir, who holds?’ is not a suitable question. The suitable question should be; ‘Venerable sir, on account of what is holding?’ Explaining it rightfully, holding is on account of craving and on account of holding is being.

“Thus is the arising of the whole mass of unpleasantness.

8. “Phagguna, with the fading and cessation of the six spheres, without a remainder, ceases contact. With the cessation of contact is the cessation of feelings. With the cessation of feelings is the cessation of craving. With the cessation of craving is cessation of holding. With the cessation of holding is cessation of being. With the cessation of being is the cessation of birth With the cessation of birth, cease decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress.

“Thus the whole mass of unpleasantness ceases.”

 

12. 2. 3.

(13) Samaṇa-brahmana I –– Recluses and Brahmins I

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

From there the Blessed One addressed the monks: “Monks!” Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.” And the Blessed One said thus:

2. “Monks, the monks who do not know decay and death, the arising of decay and death, the cessation of decay and death and the path leading to the cessation of decay and death, do not know birth ... re ... being ... re ... holding ... re ...craving ... re ... feelings ... re ... contact ... re ... the six spheres ... re ... name and matter ... re ... consciousness ... re ... determinations ... re ... do not know the arising of determinations, the cessation of determinations and the path leading to the cessation of determinations.

“Monks, these recluses and brahmins are not mine. Among recluses they cannot be counted as recluses and among brahmins they cannot be counted brahmins. And these recluses and brahmins would not realize and abide in recluseship or the state of a brahmin in this life.

3. “Monks, whoever recluses and brahmins, know decay and death, the arising of decay and death, the cessation of decay and death and the path leading to the cessation of decay and death. They know birth ... re ... being ... re ... holding ... re ...craving ... re ... feelings ... re ... contact ... re ... the six spheres ... re ... name and matter ... re ... consciousness ... re ... determinations ... re ... Monks, these recluses and brahmins are mine. Among recluses they can be counted as recluses and among brahmins they can be counted brahmins. And these recluses and brahmins would realize and abide in the recluseship or the state of a brahmin in this life.”

 

12. 2. 4.

(14) Samaṇa-brahmaṇa II –– Recluses and Brahmins II

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

From there the Blessed One addressed the monks: “Monks!” Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.” And the Blessed One said thus:

2. “Monks, some recluses and brahmins do not know, these things, the arising of these things, the cessation of these things and the path leading to the cessation of these things.

3. “What things do they not know, the arising of what do they not know, the cessation of what do they not know and the path leading to the cessation of what things do they not know?

4. “They do not know decay and death, the arising of decay and death, the cessation of decay and death and the path leading to the cessation of decay and death. They do not know birth ... re ... being ... re ... holding ... re ...craving ... re ... feelings ... re ... contact ... re ... the six spheres ... re ... name and matter ... re ... consciousness ... re ... determinations ... re ... They do not know the things stated above. They do not know their arising, their cessation and the path leading to their cessation.

5. “Monks, these recluses and brahmins are not mine. Among recluses they cannot be counted as recluses and among brahmins they cannot be counted brahmins. And these recluses and brahmins would not realize and abide in the recluseship or become brahmin in this life.

6. “Monks, whoever recluses and brahmins, know these things, the arising of these things, the cessation of these things and the path leading to the cessation of these things.

7. “What things do they know, the arising of what do they know, the cessation of what do they know and the path leading to the cessation of what things do they know?

8. “They know decay and death, the arising of decay and death, the cessation of decay and death and the path leading to the cessation of decay and death. They know birth ... re ... being ... re ... holding ... re ...craving ... re ... feelings ... re ... contact ... re ... the six spheres ... re ... name and matter ... re ... consciousness ... re ... determinations ... re ... They know the things stated above. They know their arising, their cessation and the path leading to their cessation.

9. “Monks, these recluses and brahmins are mine. Among recluses they can be counted as recluses and among brahmins they can be counted brahmins. And these recluses and brahmins would realize and abide in the recluseship or become a brahmin in this life.”

 

12. 2. 5.

(15) Kaccānagotto –– Venerable Kacchānagotta

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then venerable Kacchānagotta approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting, venerable Kacchānagotta said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, it is said right view, for what is it said right view?”

4. “Kacchāna, the worldling for most of the time is settled in either ‘there is’ or ‘there isn’t.’

5. “Kacchāna, to him who sees, the arising of the world, as it really is, with right wisdom, ‘the world is not’ does not occur. To him who sees, the cessation of the world, as it really is, with right wisdom, ‘the world is’ does not occur.

6. “Kacchāna, the worldling for most of the time approaches the active process of collecting substratum to get settled in a bond. He should not approach and resolve, to settle in the active process of collecting substratum, not seeing the self as mine. Only unpleasantness rises, and it ceases. He should not doubt about it. This knowledge should become his own not another’s. Kacchāna, with this much he becomes one of right view.

7. “Kacchāna, ‘everything is there’ is one extreme and ‘everything is not there’ is the other extreme.

“The Thus Gone One, not reaching to either of these two extremes, teaches in the middle.

8. “On account of ignorance arise determinations. On account of determinations arise consciousness ... re ... Thus is the arising of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

“With the cessation of ignorance without a remainder cease determinations. With the cessation of determinations cease consciousness. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

 

12. 2. 6.

(16) Dhammakathiko –– A Learned Teacher

1. I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then a certain monk approached the Blessed One, worshipped and sat on a side.

3. Sitting, that monk said to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, it is said a learned teacher, who is a learned teacher?”

4. “The monk teaches the method to be weary, to fade out and to cease from decay and death. That monk is a learned teacher true to the word.

5. “The monk falls to the method of becoming weary, fading out and ceasing from decay and death. That monk has fallen to the method of following the Teaching, true to the word.

6. “The monk wearied, faded out has ceased from decay and death. That monk is released without clinging is extinguished in this life, true to the word.

7. “The monk teaches the method for the weariness, fading out and cessation from birth ... re ... being, ... re ... holding ... re ... craving ... re ... feelings ... re ... contact ... re ... six spheres ... re ... name and matter ... re ... consciousness ... re ... determinations ... re ... ignorance. That monk is a learned teacher true to the word.

8. “The monk falls to the method of becoming weary, fading out and ceasing from ignorance. That monk has fallen to the method of following the Teaching, true to the word.

9. “The monk wearied and faded out has ceased from ignorance. That monk is released without clinging is extinguished in this life, true to the word.”

 

12. 2. 7.

(17) Acela Kassapa –– Without Clothes

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the squirrels’ sanctuary in the bamboo grove in Rajagaha.

I

2. The Blessed One put on robes in the morning and taking bowl and robes entered Rajagaha for the alms round.

3. Acela Kassapa seeing the Blessed One in the distance approached, exchanged friendly greetings and stood on a side.

4. Standing on a side Acela Kassapa said to the Blessed One: “We will ask a certain question from good Gotama, if we are permitted to ask and if good Gotama would explain it to us.”

“Kassapa, it is not the right time to question, we are going from house to house.”

5. For the second time Acela Kassapa said to the Blessed One: “We will ask a certain question from good Gotama, if we are permitted to ask and if good Gotama would explain it to us.”

“Kassapa, it is not the right time to ask a question, we are going from house to house.”

6. For the third time, Acela Kassapa said to the Blessed One: “We will ask a certain question from good Gotama, if we are permitted to ask and if good Gotama would explain it to us.”

“Kassapa, it is not the right time to ask a question, we are going from house to house.”

Then Acela Kassapa said: “I do not desire to ask many things from good Gotama.”

Then the Blessed One said: “Ask what you desire to ask.”

Il

7. “Good Gotama, is unpleasantness brought about by oneself?”

The Blessed One said: “Kassapa, do not say that.”

8. “Good Gotama, is unpleasantness brought about by another?”

The Blessed One said: “Kassapa, do not say that.”

9. “Good Gotama, is unpleasantness brought about by oneself and another?”

The Blessed One said: “Kassapa, do not say that.”

10. “Good Gotama, is unpleasantness not brought about by oneself or another, does it occurs without a reason?”

The Blessed One said: “Kassapa, do not say that.”

11. “Good Gotama, is there no unpleasantness.”

“Kassapa, it is not that there is no unpleasantness, there is unpleasantness.”

12. “Then good Gotama, does not know and does not see unpleasantness.”

“Kassapa, I do know and see unpleasantness.”

13. “What, good Gotama, when asked is unpleasantness brought about by oneself, you said, ‘Kassapa, do not say that.’ When asked is unpleasantness brought about by another you said, ‘Kassapa, do not say that.’ When asked is unpleasantness brought about by oneself and another you said, ‘Kassapa, do not say that.’ When asked is unpleasantness not brought about by oneself or another, does it occur without a reason, you said, ‘Kassapa, do not say that.’ When asked, is there no unpleasantness, you said, ‘Kassapa, it is not that there is no unpleasantness, there is unpleasantness.’ And when I said does good Gotama not know and not see unpleasantness, you said, Kassapa, ‘I do know and see unpleasantness.’ Venerable sir, tell me about unpleasantness and teach me about unpleasantness.”

14. “Kassapa, when it is said he does and he feels it, it’s from the beginning conscious of unpleasantness brought about by oneself and leads to eternity view.

“When it is said, he does and another feels it, with interrupted feelings, from the beginning conscious of unpleasantness brought about by another and leads to the view of annihilation.

15. “Kassapa, the Thus Gone One, not reaching to either of these two extremes, teaches in the middle. On account of ignorance arise determinations. On account of determinations arise consciousness ... re ... Thus is the arising of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

“With the cessation of ignorance without a remainder cease determinations. With the cessation of determinations cease consciousness. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

III

16. When, this was said, Acela Kassapa said thus to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, I understand it. It’s as though something overturned is put upright. It’s as though holding a light thinking may those who have sight, see forms. Thus in many ways the Teaching is explained by the Blessed One. Now I take refuge in good Gotama, in the Teaching and the Community of monks. May I gain the going forth and the higher ordination in the dispensation of the Blessed One.”

17. “Kassapa, whoever of some other sect earlier, desires the going forth and the higher ordination in this dispensation, leads a probationary period of four months. This is to test the difference in his behavior. At the end of the four months, if the monks are satisfied and if the probationer desires the going forth and the higher ordination, he is given the going forth and the higher ordination.”

18. “Venerable sir, if someone from another sect earlier, desiring the going forth and the higher ordination in this dispensation, should lead a probationary period of four months, to test the difference in the behavior and at the end of the four months, if the monks are satisfied and if the probationer desires the going forth and the higher ordination is given, I will lead a probationary period of four years and if the monks are satisfied may they give me the going forth and the higher ordination.”

19. Acela Kassapa gained the going forth and the higher ordination in the dispensation of the Blessed One.

IV

20. Soon after the higher ordination venerable Kassapa, secluded and withdrawing from the crowd, abode diligent to dispel, and before long for whatever purpose sons of clansmen rightfully leave the household and become homeless, that noble end of the holy life he realized and attained here and now. He knew birth is destroyed, the holy life is lived, duties are done there is nothing more to wish.

21. Venerable Kassapa became a worthy one.

 

12. 2. 8.

(18) Timbaruko –– The Wandering Ascetic Timbaruka

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. Then Timbaruka the wandering ascetic approached the Blessed One, exchanged friendly greetings and sat on a side.

3. Sitting on a side Timbaruka the wandering ascetic said to the Blessed One: “Good Gotama, is pleasantness and unpleasantness brought about by oneself?”

The Blessed One said: “Timbaruka, do not say that.”

4. “Good Gotama, is pleasantness and unpleasantness brought about by another?”

The Blessed One said: “Timbaruka, do not say that.”

5. “Good Gotama, is pleasantness and unpleasantness brought about by oneself and another?”

The Blessed One said: “Timbaruka, do not say that.”

6. “Good Gotama, if pleasantness and unpleasantness is not brought about by oneself or another, does it occur without a reason?”

The Blessed One said: “Timbaruka, do not say that.”

7. “Good Gotama, is there no pleasantness and unpleasantness?”

8. “Timbaruka, it is not that there is no pleasantness and unpleasantness, there is pleasantness and unpleasantness.”

“Then good Gotama, does not know and does not see pleasantness and unpleasantness.”

9. “Timbaruka, I do know and see unpleasantness.”

10. “What, good Gotama, when asked is pleasantness and unpleasantness brought about by oneself, you said, ‘Timbaruka, do not say that.’ When asked is pleasantness and unpleasantness brought about by another you said, ‘Timbaruka, do not say that.’ When asked is pleasantness and unpleasantness brought about by oneself and another you said, ‘Timbaruka, do not say that.’ When asked if pleasantness and unpleasantness is not brought about by oneself or another, does it occur without a reason, you said, ‘Timbaruka, do not say that.’ When asked, is there no pleasantness and unpleasantness, you said, ‘Timbaruka, it is not that there is no pleasantness and unpleasantness, there is pleasantness and unpleasantness.’ And when I said does good Gotama not know and not see pleasantness and unpleasantness, you said, ‘Timbaruka, I do know and see pleasantness and unpleasantness.’ Venerable sir, tell me about pleasantness and unpleasantness and teach me about pleasantness and unpleasantness.”

11. “Timbaruka, when it is, he does and he feels it, it’s from the beginning conscience of pleasantness and unpleasantness, brought about by oneself. I do not say that.

12. “When it is, he does and another feels it, with interrupted feelings, from the beginning conscience of pleasantness and unpleasantness brought about by another. I do not say that.

13. “Timbaruka, the Thus Gone One, not reaching to either of these two extremes, teaches in the middle On account of ignorance arise determinations. On account of determinations arise consciousness ... re ... Thus is the arising of the complete mass of unpleasantness.

“With the cessation of ignorance without a remainder cease determinations. With the cessation of determinations cease consciousness. Thus is the cessation of the complete mass of unpleasantness.”

14. When, this was said, Timbaruka said thus to the Blessed One: “Venerable sir, I understand it. It’s as though something overturned is put upright. It’s as though, may those who have sight see forms. Thus in many ways the Teaching is explained by the Blessed One. Now I take refuge in good Gotama, in the Teaching and the Community of monks. Good Gotama, remember me as a disciple who has taken refuge until I die.”

 

12. 2. 9.

(19) Bālena Paṇḍito –– The Difference between the Fool and the Wise One

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, to the fool obstructed by ignorance and associated by craving this body arises. To him name and matter is something external to the body. Thus because of this name and matter arise a contact in these same six spheres and the fool experiences pleasant and unpleasant feelings on account of that contact, in some way or another.

3. “Monks, to the wise one obstructed by ignorance and associated by craving this body arises. To him name and matter is something external to the body. Thus because of this name and matter arise, a contact in these same six spheres and the wise one experiences pleasant and unpleasant feelings on account of that contact, in some way or another.

4. “Then monks, what is the difference, what is the concluding factor between the fool and the wise one?”

5. “Venerable sir, the Blessed One is the leader for the Teaching it is the refuge of the Blessed One. Good! It occurs to the Blessed One. May the Blessed One explain it and the monks will bear it in their minds hearing it from the Blessed One.”

6. “Then monks, listen carefully, I am going to explain it.”

Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.”

7. The Blessed One said: “Monks, as long as the fool is obstructed by ignorance and associated by craving, this body arises. The fool has not dispelled ignorance and has not exhausted the craving. What is the reason? Monks, the fool did not lead the holy life for the rightful destruction of unpleasantness therefore he aspires a body, after the breakup of the body. He being one who aspires a body is not released from birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. I say he is not released from unpleasantness.

“Monks, as long as the wise one is obstructed by ignorance and associated by craving, this body arises. The wise one has dispelled ignorance and has exhausted the craving. What is the reason? Monks, the wise one led the holy life for the rightful destruction of unpleasantness therefore he does not aspire a body, after the breakup of the body. He being one who does not aspire a body is released from birth, decay, death, grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure and distress. I say he is released from unpleasantness.

9. “Monks, this is the difference and this is the concluding factor between the fool and the wise one about leading the holy life.”

 

12. 2. 10.

(20) Paccayo –– Things that Rise On Account of A Cause

1. At one time the Blessed One was living in the monastery offered by Anāthapiṇḍika in Jeta’s grove in Sāvatthi.

2. “Monks, I will teach dependent arising and the things that rise on account of a cause. Listen and attend carefully to it.”

Those monks replied: “Yes, venerable sir.”

And the Blessed One said thus:

3. “Monks, what is dependent arising? Monks, on account of birth is decay and death. Whether Thus Gone Ones arise or not arise, whether those elements and the orderliness of causes and effects are prevalent or not prevalent, ‘because of this, that rise is there’. To that the Thus Gone One becomes wide awake, realizes it, explains it, points out, makes it prominent, uncovers it, details it, makes it clear and says, ‘Come and examine!’

4. “On account of birth is decay and death, on account of being is birth, on account of holding is being, on account of craving is holding, on account of feelings is craving, on account of a contact are feelings, on account of the six spheres is a contact, on account of name and matter are the six spheres, on account of consciousness are name and matter, on account of the threefold determinations are consciousness, on account of ignorance are the threefold determinations. Whether Thus Gone Ones arise or not arise, whether those elements and the orderliness of causes and effects are prevalent or not prevalent, ‘because of this, that rise is there’. To that the Thus Gone One becomes wide awake, realizes it, explains it, points out, makes it prominent, uncovers it, details it, makes it clear and says, ‘Come and examine!’

5. “Monks, ‘determinations are on account of ignorance’. Monks, its truthfulness, lack of confusion, lack of an alternative, the fact, it is on account of this, is called dependent arising.

6. “Monks, what are the things that arise dependently? Monks, decay and death are impermanent, produced by a combination of causes, arise on account of a cause, a wasting thing, a decreasing thing, a fading thing and a ceasing thing.

7. “Monks, birth is impermanent, produced by a combination of causes, arise on account of a cause, a wasting thing, a decreasing thing, a fading thing and a ceasing thing.

8. “Monks, being is impermanent, produced by a combination of causes, arises on account of a cause, a wasting thing, a decreasing thing, a fading thing and a ceasing thing.

9-16. “Monks, holding ... re ... craving ... re ... feelings ... re ... contact ... re ... the six spheres ... re ... name and matter ... re ... consciousness ... re ... determinations are impermanent, produced by a combination of causes, arise on account of a cause, a wasting thing, a decreasing thing, a fading thing and a ceasing thing.

17. “Monks, ignorance is impermanent, produced by a combination of causes. Arise on account of a cause, a wasting thing, a decreasing thing, a fading thing and a ceasing thing.

18. “Monks, when the noble disciple sees this dependent arising and the dependently arisen things, as it really is, with right wisdom, he does not think of the past as, was I in the past, or wasn’t I in the past, who was I in the past, what was I in the past.

19. “He does not think of the future, as, ‘Will I be in the future or will I not be in the future?’ ‘Who will I be in the future or what will I be in the future?’

20. “He will not have doubts about the present either as ‘Am I present, or am I not, who am I or what am I? And this being from where did it come, where is it going?’ It is not possible that he should have those doubts.

21. “What is the reason? Monks, the noble disciple has thoroughly seen this dependent arising and the dependently arisen things, as it really is, with right wisdom.”